Our build out of the Open Compute Windmill V3 server utilizes the Mellanox MCX342A XCAN 10GbE, 2-p SFP+ mezzanine card. By default, the Mellanox card is not natively supported by CentOS 6.4.

That being said, I had to download the appropriate driver from Mellanox here. That being said, I also needed quite a few RPM’s to do the driver install, I did:

Even then, I was getting an error:

As it turns out, the symbolic link of /lib/modules/2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64/build to ../../../usr/src/kernels/xxxxxxx was incorrect. I had to do:

within /lib/modules/2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64/

Only then was I able to correctly install the Mellanox driver.

After installing Cisco UCS and performing the initial setup of the UCS Fabric Interconnects; there is a lot of work that needs to be completed prior to configuring the blade Service Profiles.

This can be done a multitude of ways, manually through UCSM, scripted through SSH or now through PowerShell using Cisco PowerTool. This allows us to use variables at the top of the script; these variables allow us to make the script portable for various customer deployments.

There are a couple features that are not working yet:

  1. Setting the Global Power Allocation Policy – due to the enormous lack of detail in the get-help sections of Cisco’s PowerTool, I have been unable to find which function controls the Global Power Allocation Policy.  I believe it to be the set-ucspowergroup cmd-let but I have been unable to make it work correctly.
  2. Adding custom roles with customer permissions – the add-ucsuserrole cmd-let is not very well documented either, like others; I cannot seem to figure out how to get this cmd-let to create a new role with custom permissions.

When building out your UCS deployment, you create a series of Fibre Channel (FC) uplinks. Then you have to go back and add those FC uplinks to the VSAN’s that you created. This can be tedious if you have a lot of FC uplinks as you would need to modify each one. With Cisco’s Powertool, you can do this quite quickly with no mouse movement :)

As you can see:

are variable used so that you only need to modify the VSAN ID once. Otherwise, you would need to specify on each and every line.

This took me a while to figure out as Cisco’s get-help files (man pages for Linux folks) leave a lot to be desired.

if you run:

You get:

Which would lead you to believe that this command would work just fine:

But it does not, you have to pipeline through the get-ucsvsan output first.

VMware’s recent announcement of Horizon Suite, Horizon Workspace, Horizon View and Horizon Mirage seems to be lacking mention of ThinApp! So where did it go?

VMware Horizon Menu

VMware Horizon Menu

As we both know, VMware Horizon Mirage (formally Wanova) and Horizon View are the same products that they have always been. Horizon Workspace and Horizon Suite are the new kids on the block. With Horizon Suite being just a bundle of View, Mirage and Workspace. More »